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Hotel Tresanton

Things to do

1. Picnic amongst the bluebells

We were just about to tell you why Spring is such a glorious time to visit when Joanna Fortnam, The Daily Telegraph’s Gardening Editor, beat us to it…and said it all so much better.

TrelissickCaerhaysTrewithen and The Lost Gardens of Heligan are nearby; Glendurgan and Trebah are a short drive away on the Helford River. Still worth a visit even in the winter months.

P.S. Our sister hotel Endsleigh is set in 108 acres of gardens, woodlands, follies and grottos created by Humphry Repton. This year we are celebrating 200 years since the creation of this garden. See website for special events.

2. Pinuccia

From Easter to the end of September, our skipper will take you sailing around Falmouth bay. This area, which includes the estuary of the Helford and the Fal rivers, is one of the most beautiful and safe areas for sailing and boating in Britain.

tresanton.com/pinuccia 

Church

3. Walk to St Just-in-Roseland church

The best walks are along the coastal paths. There is a delightful three-mile stroll past St Mawes castle, built by Henry VIII in 1542 and through the fields beside the sea to the 14th Century church of St. Just-in-Roseland, which John Betjeman called ‘to some people, the most beautiful churchyard on earth’. A regular ferry during the summer months will take you to the other side of the harbour where there are longer walks past the lighthouse, to Porthscatho and beyond. Best to take a picnic from the hotel to enjoy the scenery throughout lunch.

Distance 3 miles   Duration 2 hours

Download our walking map

 ONDA

4.ONDA

The hotel shop

5. Waves and light   

Two of our therapists, Sarah and Alex, have been inspired by the mystical nature of the waves to choreograph a four-handed massage named Apollo Awakening. It captures the energy and serenity of St Mawes’ bay as the two therapists work together in a wave-like flow that induces a profound awakening of your senses, re-connecting energy pathways from your core to the tips of your toes.  

tresanton.com/treatments

 Tate

6. Tate St Ives and beyond

Purchase an Art Pass ticket for entry to the Leach Pottery, Tate St Ives, The Barbara Hepworth Museum (pictured) and Penlee House Museum and Gallery.

Well that far west, take the opportunity to explore Penwith which inspired many of the artists who lived and painted in St Ives. Zennor, Cape Cornwall, Sennen Cove and the moors in between St Ives and Penzance are all a must.

For lunch try The Gurnard’s Head.

tate.org.uk/stives

7. Day at the Museum

The National Maritime Museum in Falmouth is only a charming 20 minute ferry trip from St Mawes. It offers a unique collection of extraordinary boats and interactive displays which are great fun for children. Stein’s fish and chips is next door.

nmmc.co.uk

Porthcurno Telegraph Museum has reopened after an extensive refurbishment. Porthcurno, in the far West of Cornwall, was the hub of international cable communications from 1870 to 1970. During WWII secret tunnels were dug by Cornish miners to house the entire telegraph operations and protect them from enemy bombings.

porthcurno.org.uk

8. The Eden Project

Already world famous, the huge greenhouses contain tropical and Mediterranean zones. An extraordinary achievement, well worth a visit. Endless entertainment for children and adults alike. The ice rink is a popular attraction during the winter months.

edenproject.com

Buy at ONDA

9. Rising Ground

Grab as your guide a copy of Rising Ground, a Search for the Spirit of Place by Philip Marsden from ONDA, and follow his voyage through time and place, from the Neolithic ritual landscape of Bodmin Moor to the Arthurian traditions of Tintagel, from the mysterious china-clay country to the granite tors and tombs of the far south-west.

10. Find a keepsake of your stay

Head down to the most southerly point of the British mainland, Lizard Point, and find one of the little serpentine workshops surrounding Kynance. Here you can buy a little stone lighthouse to remind you of us!

 

I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,

And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking,
And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.

I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

I must down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,
To the gull’s way and the whale’s way, where the wind’s like a whetted knife;
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,
And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over.

John Masefield, Sea Fever, Salt-Water Ballads, 1902 

 

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